The American Physiological Society Press Release

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APS Contact: Stacy Brooks

Email: sbrooks@the-aps.org

Phone: 301.634.7209

Race Now or Later? Calculating the Best Time to Compete after Altitude Training

Bethesda, MD (April 3, 2014)—Altitude training is a popular practice used by elite athletes to improve endurance in competitions, such as marathons and cycling races, that take place at sea level. Training at in a lower-oxygen environment (at elevations between 2,000–3,000 meters) jumpstarts the body’s production of red blood cells. More red blood cells supply the muscles with more oxygen and increase endurance.  Even after returning to sea level, the performance-enhancing physiological changes remain for days and weeks, providing athletes with an extra competitive edge during races.  

While a number of studies focus on the optimal time to begin altitude training before competition, few address the best time to come down from altitude and how long athletes should wait to reacclimatize before competing. Robert F. Chapman et al. search for the answers in the new review article “Timing of return from altitude training for optimal sea level performance,” published in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

From the authors: “We propose that the optimal time to compete after return to sea level after chronic altitude training will be influenced primarily by the interaction of three components: timing of the decay in red blood cell mass, consequences of ventilatory acclimatization, and alterations in biomechanical and neuromuscular factors associated with force production. As research efforts continue in the search to elucidate the best practices and application of altitude training for endurance performance, we believe the issue of timing of return to sea level prior to competition, largely ignored, deserves special focus.”

Read the full article: http://ow.ly/vmiMD.

The research is one of 15 articles on hypoxia—this month’s highlighted topic in the Journal of Applied Physiology. The full Table of Contents is available here: http://ow.ly/vmq3C.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS: To schedule an interview with a member of the research team, please contact Stacy Brooks at sbrooks@the-aps.org or 301-634-7209.

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents more than 11,000 members and publishes 14 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

 


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