The American Physiological Society Press Release

press release logo

APS Contact: APS Communications Office

Email: communications@the-aps.org

Phone: 301.634.7209

Twitter: @APSPhysiology

Exercise May Fight Depression in Older Adults, Study Suggests

Physical activity promotes increased expression of ‘feel-good’ chemicals through muscle changes

Rockville, Md. (January 31, 2019)—New research suggests that exercise-induced muscle changes could help boost mood in older adults. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.

Exercise increases the expression of certain proteins (transcription factors) that help regulate gene expression and the processing (metabolism) of tryptophan in the body. Tryptophan is a mood-enhancing chemical closely related to serotonin, a substance that also affects mood. Many people with depression have been found to have low levels of serotonin in the blood. Tryptophan metabolism happens almost completely through the kynurenine pathway, a “metabolic route” that has two branches: one that can protect brain tissue (neuroprotective) and one that can cause harm (neurotoxic).

The neuroprotective branch of the kynurenine pathway needs an enzyme called KAT to be able to function. Aerobic and resistance exercise have been found to increase KAT activity, thereby promoting tryptophan metabolism via the neuroprotective branch instead of the neurotoxic branch. Preliminary research in younger adults has suggested that physical activity-related changes in the muscles may play a role in this mood-boosting effect of exercise. However, not as much is known about these changes—and their potential as an alternative treatment for depression—in older adults.

Researchers from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, studied a small group of healthy older men without history of depression. The men, who were 65 or older, participated in a 12-week exercise trial consisting of resistance exercise (leg and shoulder presses) and high -intensity interval training on a stationary bicycle. The research team took blood and muscle samples and examined gene and protein expression in the muscles before, during and after the trial. They found that expression of transcription factors and KAT increased significantly during the exercise trial. These results were consistent with previous research performed in younger adults.

“The significant exercise training-induced increase in the expression of skeletal muscle transcription factors and KAT in older adults is encouraging given the potential implications related to kynurenine pathway regulation. Future studies are warranted to explore the impact of various exercise modalities and intensities on transient changes of such factors in depressed adults,” the researchers wrote.

Read the full article, “Exercise training impacts skeletal muscle gene expression related to the kynurenine pathway,” published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS: To schedule an interview with a member of the research team, please contact the APS Communications Office or 301-634-7314. Find more research highlights in the APS Press Room.

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents more than 10,000 members and publishes 15 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

 


RelatedItems

Experts Convene to Discuss the Effects, Potential of Exercise throughout the Lifespan

Released October 18, 2016 - Hundreds of researchers on the leading edge of exercise science will meet at the Integrative Biology of Exercise meeting in Phoenix (Nov. 2–4). Symposia topics will cover brain cell stress responses, metabolic diseases, mitochondrial signaling, sedentary behavior, exercise and pregnancy, cardiovascular disease, aging, stem cells and more.

July APSselect Research Highlights

Released July 1, 2015 - Brown adipose transplantation reverses type 1 diabetes in mice; heme oxygenase system as a potential therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases; benefits of caloric restriction for muscle metabolism and mass during middle age; muscle signature of a champion sprinter are among this month’s selected articles.

From: 
Email:  
To: 
Email:  
Subject: 
Message:

~/Custom.Templates/PressRelease.aspx