The American Physiological Society Press Release

press release logo

APS Contact: APS Communications Office

Email: communications@the-aps.org

Phone: 301.634.7209

Twitter: @APSPhysiology


Exercise May Improve Kidney Function in Obesity, Reduce Risk of Renal Disease

Rat study finds better blood vessel health and lower urinary protein levels

Rockville, Md. (December 4, 2018)—Aerobic exercise may reduce the risk of diabetes-related kidney disease in some people, according to a new study. The research is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for December.

Kidney (renal) disease is a common complication associated with type 2 diabetes, especially in people who are obese and do not exercise regularly. Early markers of diabetes-related kidney disease include high levels of protein in the urine and a reduced ability of the kidneys to filter out waste from the bloodstream. Chronic kidney disease can also lead to an imbalance of minerals in the body, particularly in the bones. Altered bone mineral content may contribute to disorders, such as the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis.

Researchers studied two groups of rats—both composed of a combination of lean and obese animals—to explore the effect of exercise on kidney disease risk factors. The “exercise” group was exercised on a treadmill for 45–60 minutes each day, five days a week. The “sedentary” group was trained for 15 minutes twice a week to mimic a human sedentary lifestyle.

The most significant finding the researchers saw was an improvement in blood vessel health and overall kidney function. All of the obese rats, regardless of group, had hardening or scarring of the renal arteries, increased protein in the urine, and fat deposits within the filtering structures of the kidneys. However, the obese rats in the exercise group showed a reduction in these factors when compared to the sedentary obese rats. The exercised obese rats also had changes in bone composition—higher levels of calcium and copper, but lower concentrations of iron—when compared to the lean rats. These changes were not enough, however, to affect the risk of developing osteoporosis.

“We conclude that the introduction of an exercise program based in [aerobic interval training] is a good strategy to present alterations in kidney structure and urinary parameters caused by obesity and the development of diabetic [kidney disease] in obese Zucker rats,” the researchers wrote.

Read the full article, “Aerobic interval exercise improves renal functionality and affects mineral metabolism in obese Zucker rats,” published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology. It is highlighted as one of this month’s “best of the best” as part of the American Physiological Society’s APSselect program. Read all of this month’s selected research articles.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS: To schedule an interview with a member of the research team, please contact the APS Communications Office or 301-634-7314. Find more research highlights in the APS Press Room.
 

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents more than 10,500 members and publishes 15 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

 


RelatedItems

Overweight Female Kidney Donors May Be at Risk for Preeclampsia

Female kidney donors who are overweight may be at a higher risk for preeclampsia during pregnancy, according to a new study. The increased risk is due to a reduction in a type of kidney function called renal functional reserve (RFR). The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology.

Cardiovascular Aging Symposium Explores Dysfunction and Disease Development

Released August 12, 2017 - During the “Novel Implications for Blood Flow and Vascular Dysfunction in Non-cardiovascular Related Disease” symposium at the APS Cardiovascular Aging: New Frontiers and Old Friends conference, researchers will present findings that emphasize the interaction between age-related cardiovascular dysfunction and disease whose risk increases with age.

From: 
Email:  
To: 
Email:  
Subject: 
Message:

~/Custom.Templates/PressRelease.aspx