2017 Press Releases
Below are the American Physiological Society's press releases for 2017. Press releases are listed in descending order with the most recent release first.
2017 Press Releases

Altered Immune Cells May Both Contribute to Preeclampsia and Offer New Hope for Treatment

Released April 23, 2017 - In a new study presented at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017, researchers have found that the immune system’s natural killer (NK) cells activate and change in response to placental ischemia. Disrupting these altered cells seems to blunt some of the dangerous complications of the condition, including high blood pressure (hypertension) and inflammation in the mother and growth restriction in the fetus.

APS 2017 Distinguished Lectureship Award Winners to Present Talks at Experimental Biology

Released April 18, 2017 - APS is pleased to recognize our outstanding Distinguished Lecturer honorees—including Michael J. Welsh, MD; Brant Isakson, PhD; and Kurt Albertine, PhD—who will present their talks at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017.

APS Celebrates 50 Years of Diversity in Physiology during Porter Fellowship Anniversary

Released April 19, 2017 - Since 1967, the American Physiological Society’s (APS’s) Porter Physiology Development Fellowship has supported 140 minority doctoral and postdoctoral researchers in the study of the physiological sciences and related careers. In honor of the program’s 50th anniversary, APS shares the stories of 24 past Fellows in a commemorative book and will celebrate current and past Porter Fellows and the legacy of the Fellowship at Experimental Biology in Chicago and throughout 2017.

Nobel Laureate, Esteemed Researchers Participate in APS President’s Symposium

Released April 18, 2017 - APS President Jane Reckelhoff, PhD, of the University of Mississippi Medical Center, has developed an engaging President’s Symposium Series to be presented during the 2017 Experimental Biology meeting in Chicago. Three symposia will focus on the theme “Research Advances in Sex/Gender and Developmental Programming of Chronic Diseases.”

Cortical Nerve Function in Former Amputees Remains Poor Decades after Reconstructive Surgery

Released April 11, 2017 - Researchers have found that the nerve cells (neurons) controlling sensation and movement of the hands show injury-induced changes for years after hand amputation, reattachment or transplant. The small study, the first of its kind to non-invasively explore the health and function of the cortical neurons (neuronal integrity) in these populations at the neurochemical level, is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology. The manuscript was chosen as an APSselect article for April.

To Eat or Not to Eat (Before Exercising): That Is the Question

Released March 6, 2017 - Exercise enthusiasts often wonder whether it’s better to eat or fast before a workout. A new study is the first of its kind to show the effects of eating versus fasting on gene expression in adipose (fat) tissue in response to exercise. This difference highlights the different roles fat plays in powering and responding to exercise. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.

High-Fat Diet during Pregnancy Compromises Offspring’s Lung Health

Released March 29, 2017 - Women who follow a high-fat diet during pregnancy may increase their children’s risk for asthma. A mouse study by Oregon Health and Science University researchers suggests that consistent consumption of fat-laden foods may change the immune response of the offsprings’ respiratory system. The article is published in Physiological Reports.

Statins May Provide Treatment Alternative for Chronic Liver Disease

Released March 23, 2017 - Statin drugs are widely used to manage high cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. But in a new review of more than 50 studies, researchers cite reductions in liver inflammation and improvements in other related factors as reasons why statins make good candidates for treating chronic liver disease. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

Synched Work Schedules during “Antarctic Summer” May Affect Sleep, Wake Hormones

Released March 9, 2017 - The continuous daylight conditions of summer in Antarctica are known to interfere with physiological functions such as sleep patterns and the release of melatonin, a hormone associated with circadian rhythms and sleep. Now, a study offers new information about why people in this region sleep poorly, and suggests that social behavior may also play a role. The study, published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for March.

Caffeine Reduces Oxidative Stress, Improves Oxygen-Induced Lung Injury

Released March 8, 2017 - A new study finds that caffeine may protect the lungs from damage caused by prolonged oxygen therapy, such as oxygen supplementation given to premature babies. The article is the first of its kind to study the positive effects of caffeine on the lungs’ minute tissue structures. It is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

“Superhero Physiology: the Case for Captain America”

Released February 28, 2017 - A common challenge to educators across all disciplines is making learning interesting for students. Researchers from Mississippi State University outline a compelling strategy to teach physiology to undergraduate students: using real physiological concepts to explain some of the extreme physical transformations of the fictional superhero Captain America. The article is published in Advances in Physiology Education.

Raising Dietary Potassium to Sodium Ratio Helps Reduce Heart, Kidney Disease

Released February 21, 2017 - Reducing sodium (salt) in the diet has been recommended to lower blood pressure and the risk of heart disease. However, in a new review article, University of Southern California researchers found that increasing dietary potassium is as important to improving the risk factors for cardiovascular and kidney disease as limiting dietary sodium. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Sports-Related Concussion Negatively Affects Heart Rate, Blood Pressure

Released February 9, 2017 - A new study finds that concussion causes short-term impairment of the cardiovascular system but that these cardiovascular symptoms typically resolve within three days of the injury. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Researchers Find Unhealthy Gut Microbes a Cause of Hypertension

Released February 2, 2017 - Researchers have found that the microorganisms residing in the intestines (microbiota) play a role in the development of high blood pressure in rats. The study is published in Physiological Genomics. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.

Whole-Body Heat Stress Lowers Exercise Capacity, Blood Flow in Men

Released February 1, 2017 - Researchers have found that prolonged exposure to high temperatures can raise both the skin and core temperature, reducing blood flow to the brain and limbs during exercise and limiting the ability to exercise for long periods. The study, the first of its kind to separate the effects of skin- versus internal-raised temperature (hyperthermia), is published in Physiological Reports.

APS Announces Move to Atypon for Journal Hosting

Released January 31, 2017 - APS will move its physiology research journal titles to Atypon’s Literatum platform, the professional and scholarly publishing industry’s technologically advanced and most widely used online publishing platform for hosting published content.

APS and ADI Announce Partnership to Provide Enhanced Scientific Community Support

Released January 31, 2017 - ADI will expand its financial support for a range of early career research awards across a number of fields, including cardiovascular, respiratory, physiological genomics and neural control and autonomic regulation as part of its new partnership with APS.

Food and Antibiotics May Change Microorganisms in Gut, Causing IBS

Released January 26, 2017 - A recent review of research suggests that changes to the microorganisms (microbiota) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be a cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The review article is published in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

Type, Not Just Amount, of Sugar Consumption Matters in Risk of Health Problems

Released January 19, 2017 - The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. A new study is the first of its kind to compare the effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Fit after 100: Training Helps French Bicyclist Beat His Own World Record at 103

Released January 12, 2017 - Adults over 100 years old can still increase their athletic performance and physical fitness with regular training, researchers have found. The case study of Robert Marchand, the now 105-year-old who recently broke the 100+ cycling record—again—is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Nerve-Signaling Protein Regulates Gene Associated with Schizophrenia

Released January 5, 2017 - Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, have identified a protein that regulates a gene associated with schizophrenia. The study, published in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for January.

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