The American Physiological Society Press Release

press release logo

APS Contact: APS Communications Office

Email: communications@the-aps.org

Phone: 301.634.7209

Twitter: @APSPhysiology


Researchers Suspect MicroRNAs as Potential Link Between Obesity and Heart Disease

Westminster, Colo. (August 26, 2016)—Inflammation likely plays a role in the increased risk of heart disease that comes with obesity, but scientists don’t fully understand how obesity leads to heart disease. Results from a new study suggest that small molecules known as microRNAs may be part of the pathway connecting inflammation with increased heart disease risk in obese people. The new findings will be presented at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.  

MicroRNAs, molecules that are found throughout the body’s tissues and fluids, such as blood, help regulate gene expression tied to health and disease. Because recent research has shown that microRNAs are key players in the regulation of inflammation and vascular health, researchers from the University of Colorado, Boulder, wanted to know whether obesity is associated with any changes in microRNA levels.

“Studying microRNAs circulating in the blood has the potential to increase our understanding of the higher risk for cardiovascular problems that are associated with obesity,” said study co-author Jaime Hijmans, a predoctoral research fellow in the Integrative Vascular Biology Laboratory at the University of Colorado, Boulder. “MicroRNAs might also prove to be useful as biomarkers of cardiovascular health in obese adults.”

For the study, the researchers examined levels of four microRNAs circulating in the blood of 15 normal weight and 15 obese people. The study participants were between the ages of 47 and 64 and were sedentary nonsmokers who were free of heart disease and had normal blood pressure.

The researchers found that the obese study participants had alterations in the levels of specific circulating microRNAs involved in regulating vascular inflammation, a key element of cardiovascular disease risk. These changes were seen in otherwise healthy obese adults, suggesting that obesity without other risk factors negatively affects the body’s mechanisms for regulating inflammation.

Hijmans will present “Obesity and circulating inflammation-related microRNAs” at a poster session on Friday, Aug. 26, from 12:45 to 2:45 p.m. in the Westminster IV room of the Westin Westminster Hotel.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS: The second “Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease” conference will be held Aug. 24–27 in Westminster, Colo. To read the full abstract or schedule an interview with a member of the research team, please contact the APS Communications Office or 301-634-7209.

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents more than 10,500 members and publishes 15 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

 


RelatedItems

Could the Paleo Diet Benefit Heart Health?

Released August 26, 2016 - Findings from a small study suggest that people who followed the Paleo diet for only eight weeks experienced positive effects on heart health. Preliminary findings from this research will be presented at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.

Researchers Target Gut Bacteria to Reduce Weight Gain

Released August 26, 2016 - Adding engineered bacteria into the guts of mice both kept them from gaining weight and protected them against some of the negative health effects of obesity. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.

From: 
Email:  
To: 
Email:  
Subject: 
Message:

~/Custom.Templates/PressRelease.aspx