Michael M. Grunstein
Grunstein200x150

Michael M. Grunstein

Dr. Michael Grunstein received his MSc and PhD degrees from McGill University in 1974 and 1977, respectively. Under the supervision of Dr. Joseph Milic-Emili, then Chairman of the Department of Physiology, he conducted research in the area of control of ventilation, examining reflex, mechanical and chemical mechanisms regulating the depth and frequency of breathing under different experimental conditions affecting respiration. Among the findings, this research led to the deveopment of widely used methods to quantify the contributions of central (neuromuscular) and mechanical factors controlling ventilation in patients with different lung and sleep disorders affecting respiration. Dr. Grunstein subsequently received his MD degree from McGill University in 1977 and, thereafter, completed his residency training in pediatric medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, followed by fellowship training in pediatric pulmonary medicine at the University of California and the Cardiovascular Research Institute in San Francisco. Thereafter, Dr. Grunstein held appointments as Assistant and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and at the National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine in Denver. In 1987, he became tenured Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and served as Chief of the Division of Pulmonary Medicine at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia until 1998.

As an investigator supported throughout by research grants from the NIH since 1980, Dr. Grunstein conducted research into the pathobiology of asthma, examining cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility and proliferation under different allergic and non-allergic conditions of proasthmatic sensitization. Working with both pre- and post-gradulate fellows, his lab identified certain key signaling pathways in ASM that regulate its acquisition of the asthmatic phenotype, including the autologous release of various proinflammatory/proasthmatic cytokines by sensitized ASM, the role of ASM as a superantigen-presenting cell that directly activates CD4+ T cells to release proasthmatic cytokines, the contributions of specific G proteins and their subunits in activating certain intracellular pathways that evoke proasthmatic changes in ASM contractility and that underly the asthmatic phenotype in isolated human asthmatic ASM cells. These studies, together with other original work demonstrating that ASM exhibits multiple gene expression of glucocorticoid-sensitive genes during proasthmatic stimultion, and that pro-asthmatic- stimulated ASM exhibits non-ligand-dependent activation of its endogenous glucocorticoid receptor, has led to publication of numerous scientific papers, book chapters, patents, and other publications from Dr. Grunstein’s lab.

In addition to co-editing a major two-volume textbook, entitled “Asthma”, Dr. Grunstein has lectured nationally and internationally on various topics in pulmonary medicine and on the cellular and molecular biology of asthma, and he has served on the editorial boards of several internationally recognized scientific journals. Dr. Grunstein is a member of various international medical and scientific societies, and he has also served as a standing member of the Lung Biology and Pathology Study Section of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and on the Committee on Indoor Air and Asthma at the Institute of Medicine. Finally, Dr. Grunstein has been the recipient of awards in recognition of his research accomplishments and contributions to the fields of pulmonary medicine and lung biology. Recently, Dr. Grunstein became Professor Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and he and his wife, Judi, have relocated to southern California.

 


From: 
Email:  
To: 
Email:  
Subject: 
Message:

~/Custom.Templates/Category2ColumnsResources.aspx