Schmidt-Nielsen Distinguished mentor & Scientist Award
Bodil M. Schmidt-Nielsen

The Bodil M. Schmidt-Nielsen Distinguished Mentor and Scientist Award was established to recognize Dr. Bodil M. Schmidt-Nielsen (1918-2015), the first woman President of the American Physiological Society, and a distinguished physiologist who made significant contributions in her field of fluid and electrolyte balance, and renal function. The first award was presented in 2004 to Clinton Webb, PhD.

 

The award of $1,000 and a commemorative plaque will be presented at the annual Experimental Biology meeting.  At the Bodil M. Schmidt-Nelsen Distinguished Mentor and Scientist Award Lecture and Reception, the awardee will meet with APS members and young trainee scientists, and present their perspectives on effective mentoring. This presentation should highlight the awardee’s philosophy and approach to the mentoring and training of young physiologists at all stages of their career (undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, early career). The awardee can provide an overview of influences that were important to their own development as a physiologist, specifically focusing on how their training and mentors shaped their approach to mentoring.

 

The awardee is encouraged to develop their “Top 5 Mentoring Tips” for trainees to consider as they identify their own mentors and develop their own style of mentoring. Overall, the goal of the awardee’s presentation is to highlight how they have fostered the scientific, professional and personal development of their trainees, and it should provide insight into how they provide an environment that is exceptionally conducive to education in physiology.

 

The awardee will also be expected to develop their talk into a Mentoring Forum column for publication in The Physiologist (online and in print).  Awardees will receive reimbursement of expenses incurred in association with the delivery of their presentation at the Experimental Biology meeting.

 

For more information about Dr. Schmidt-Nielsen’s achievements, please see the APS Living History Project and an article in Advances in Physiology Education at:



From: 
Email:  
To: 
Email:  
Subject: 
Message:

~/Custom.Templates/GrantSec2Columns.aspx