Institutions Granting Degrees in Physiology
Institutions Awarding Academic Degrees
with a Major In Physiology

New 2010 - Ninth Edition 

This list of institutions is result of a biennial survey conducted by the American Physiological Society. Only those institutions that offer courses of study in special areas of physiology are listed. We encourage you to visit the website of those institutions of interest to you and to email or write the contact person listed.

How Do I Search the Database?
Download the Excel file listed below. Using that file, you will be able to search on any field in the spreadsheet, including institution, city, state, country, degrees offered, and subfields of physiology. To learn more, visit the Careers in Physiology portion of the website through the link below under Resources.

What Is Physiology?
Physiology is the study of life, specifically, how cells, tissues, and organisms function. Physiologists are constantly trying to answer key questions in areas ranging from the functions of single cells to the interactions between human populations and our environment here on earth, the moon, and beyond. Physiology is important because it is the foundation upon which we build our knowledge of what "life" is, how to treat disease, and how to cope with stresses imposed upon our bodies by different environments. To learn more, visit the Careers in Physiology portion of the website through the link below under Resources.

What Do Physiologists Do?
Physiologists work in many different settings. Many physiologists work in colleges or universities, where they teach undergraduate, graduate, or medical students. They also guide doctoral (Ph.D.) students who will become the teachers and investigators of the future. Some do problem-specific or applied research in private industry. In large pharmaceutical (drug) companies, physiologists play important roles in drug discovery and the development of new disease treatments. Government laboratories, hospitals, and other clinical settings also provide opportunities to focus on research. In addition, many physiologists use their knowledge and expertise to work in full-time educational jobs or as consultants. Salaries range from good to excellent, but benefits often include more than money. For instance, professors may enjoy a high degree of job security with regular opportunities for study and research at other locations throughout the world. The need to discuss research with other scientists means that travel to meetings in the U.S. and overseas is a regular part of a physiologist's activities. Physiologists who study unusual species or the effects of environmental extremes may travel to the deserts or poles of the earth or may even journey into space. To learn more, visit the Careers in Physiology portion of the website through the link below under Resources.

How Can I Become a Physiologist?
The education of a physiologist usually begins with an undergraduate major in science or liberal arts with a strong science focus. Those with a Bachelor's or Master's degree typically work under the supervision of a senior physiologist. To be an independent investigator who directs his/her own laboratory group or teaches courses, one usually earns a Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent degree. Physiologists never stop learning. Each new generation of physiologists faces questions that require the development of new techniques, which in turn raise new questions and, often, the need to re-address earlier questions. To learn more, visit the Careers in Physiology portion of the website through the link below under Resources.

Resources

Institutions Granting Degrees - MASTER LIST (XLS)

Institutions Grant Degrees as Excel Spreadsheet

For Institutions Only

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