• Interval Exercise Training Improves Blood Vessel Function in Older:  Researchers have found that interval exercise training (resistance-based and cardiovascular) improves endothelial function in older adults. Resistance interval training in particular could help reduce the risk of heart disease in adults with type 2 diabetes. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Common Bacteria Show Promise for Treating Celiac Disease:  Researchers have isolated an enzyme from bacteria present in human saliva that has potential as a therapy for celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder that causes severe digestive and other health problems among sufferers when they consume gluten. The study, published in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for September.
  • Nonhuman Primate Research Integral to Search for Future Cures:  Research in nonhuman primates (NHP) has led to some of the most significant medical advancements known today and will be essential to continued biomedical progress, according to a new white paper developed by experts from APS and 8 other biomedical research organizations. Read more highlights and find a link to the full paper “The Critical Role of Nonhuman Primates in Medical Research.”
  • Researchers Target Gut Bacteria to Reduce Weight Gain:  Adding engineered bacteria into the guts of mice both kept them from gaining weight and protected them against some of the negative health effects of obesity. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.
  • MicroRNAs May Link Inflammation and Heart Disease in Obese People:  Results from a new study suggest that small molecules known as microRNAs may be part of the pathway connecting inflammation with increased heart disease risk in obese people. The new findings will be presented at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.
  • More...
 
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