• Eat Your Vegetables (and Fish): Another Reason Why They May Promote Heart Health:  Elevated levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)—a compound linked with the consumption of seafood and a primarily vegetarian diet—may reduce hypertension-related heart disease symptoms. New research in rats finds that low-dose treatment with TMAO reduced heart thickening (cardiac fibrosis) and markers of heart failure in an animal model of hypertension. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for November.
  • Bigger = Better: Big Bees Fly Better in Hotter Temps than Smaller Ones Do:  Arizona State University researchers have found that larger tropical stingless bee species fly better in hot conditions than smaller bees do and that larger size may help certain bee species better tolerate high body temperatures. The findings run contrary to the well-established temperature-size “rule,” which suggests that ectotherms—insects that rely on the external environment to control their temperature—are larger in cold climates and smaller in hot ones. The research will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Comparative Physiology: Complexity and Integration conference in New Orleans.
  • How Hibernators Could Help Humans Treat Illness, Conserve Energy and Get to Mars:  Researchers will gather today to discuss the potential for hibernation and the related process, torpor, to aid human health in spaceflight at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Comparative Physiology: Complexity and Integration conference in New Orleans.
  • Climate Change a Threat to Even the Most Tolerant Oysters:  Climate change-associated severe weather events may cause flooding that threatens the survival of the Olympia oyster, new research suggests. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Comparative Physiology: Complexity and Integration conference in New Orleans.
  • A Tale of Two Fishes: Researchers Observe How Rainbow Trout Populations Respond to Higher Temps:  Natural variation may help decide which rainbow trout strains are likely to survive worldwide global warming, according to a new study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Comparative Physiology: Complexity and Integration conference in New Orleans.
  • More...
  • Call for Nominations for EIC of Advances in Physiology Education :  Nominations are invited for the Editorship of Advances in Physiology Education to succeed Douglas C. Curran-Everett, who will complete his term as Editor on December 31, 2019. The APS Publications Committee plans to interview candidates in the Spring of 2019.
 
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