• July APSselect Research Highlights:  Brown adipose transplantation reverses type 1 diabetes in mice; heme oxygenase system as a potential therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases; benefits of caloric restriction for muscle metabolism and mass during middle age; muscle signature of a champion sprinter are among this month’s selected articles.
  • Electrical Nerve Stimulation Can Reverse Spinal Cord Injury Nerve Damage in Patients:  Researchers find that nerve stimulation can improve the function of peripheral nerves damaged by spinal cord injury (SCI). This technique may be a new approach to preventing long-term changes in nerve and muscle function after SCI and improving SCI rehabilitation outcomes.This research is highlighted as one of this month’s “best of the best” as part of the American Physiological Society’s APSselect program.
  • Promising New NSAID-Derivative May Be Well-Tolerated by Chronic Pain Sufferers:  Long-term use of naproxen (ALEVE), a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), is often prescribed for chronic pain conditions such as osteoarthritis. However, because of NSAID-related gastrointestinal problems including stomach and intestinal inflammation and ulcers, many are unable to tolerate ongoing use. A new study, published in the American Journal of Physiology–Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, finds that a naproxen-derivative may provide both symptom relief and gastrointestinal protection. The research is highlighted as one of this month’s “best of the best” as part of the American Physiological Society’s APSselect program.
  • Why the Bloating During Menopause? Blame the Hormones or the Lack of Them:  Many women experience water retention and bloating when their hormone levels change, but how sex hormones affect water balance is not understood. A new study offers an explanation, finding that sex hormones can directly control how the body reabsorbs water.
  • Better than Stem Cells: Researchers Develop a Faster Way to Treat the Heart after a Heart Attack :  For healing the heart after a heart attack, stem cell therapies show promise but are slow to implement. Researchers develop a new treatment called microsphere therapy that can be kept on-hand and administered more readily than stem cells.
  • More...
 
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