• Stress Hormones Spike as the Temperature Rises:  A new study in medical students finds that summer, not winter, is the season when people are most likely to have higher levels of circulating stress hormones. These non-intuitive findings contradict traditional concepts of the taxing physical toll of winter and the relaxed ease of summer. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Drinking Kefir May Prompt Brain-Gut Communication to Lower Blood Pressure:  Drinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Preconception Zinc Deficiency Could Spell Bad News for Fertility:  An estimated 10 percent of couples in the U.S. struggle with infertility. While a variety of factors can make it difficult for some people to get pregnant, ovulation disorders are a leading cause of female infertility. Now, researchers have found that zinc deficiency can negatively affect the early stages of egg development, reducing the ability of the egg cells to divide and be fertilized. This may affect fertility months in the future. The researchers will present their results at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Mental, Not Physical, Fatigue Affects Seniors’ Walking Ability:  Low “mental energy” may affect walking patterns in older adults more than physical fatigue. New research about the relationship between walking ability and self-reported mood will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Slower Calorie Burn during Pregnancy May Mean More Retained Baby Weight in Obese Black Moms:  Differences in the way women with obesity burn calories during pregnancy may be a contributor to long-term postpartum weight retention in black moms. A new study shows that despite similar levels of food intake and activity levels—and a higher proportion of fat-free mass—obese black women burned fewer calories than their white counterparts. The findings, which suggest a need for more individualized pregnancy weight gain recommendations for obese women, will be presented today at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • More...
  • Call for Nominations for EIC of Comprehensive Physiology :  Nominations are invited for the Editorship of Comprehensive Physiology to succeed David M. Pollock, who will complete his term as Editor on June 30, 2019. The APS Publications Committee plans to interview candidates in the Fall of 2018.
  • Call for Nominations for EIC of AJP-Renal Physiology:  Nominations are invited for the Editorship of The American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology to succeed Phillip Darwin Bell, who will complete his term as Editor on June 30, 2019. The APS Publications Committee plans to interview candidates in the Fall of 2018.
  • Call for Nominations for EIC of AJP-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology:  Nominations are invited for the Editorship of AJP-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology to succeed Willis K. Samson, who will complete his term as Editor on June 30, 2019. The APS Publications Committee plans to interview candidates in the Fall of 2018.
 
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